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Description

In the last episode, Luke interviewed Alex and Yvette Valencia. We heard about Alex and Yvette’s life stories and how We Do Web came to be.

This week’s conversation highlights We Do Web and what they’re all about. The goal of this conversation between Alex and Luke is to help listeners like you understand if what We Do Web has to offer is something that would benefit you or someone you know.

Listen in to Luke and Alex’s conversation as they discuss who We Do Web is best suited to help, who they really aren’t good for, and why a law firm may or may not want to hire them.

Transcription

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Luke W Russell:
Welcome to Lawful Good. Powerful Partners, a series about interesting and caring folks that we know and trust, whose journeys brought them to collaboration with the legal community. Today, I’m chatting with Alex Valencia, one of our Lawful Good, powerful partners. The goal of this conversation between Alex and I is to help listeners like you understand if what their company, We Do Web, has to offer is something that would benefit you or someone you know.

If you haven’t already listened to my interview with Alex and Yvette about their life stories and how We Do Web came to be, you can hear that and so much more in the previous episode. As you can probably imagine, Lawful Good requires an enormous amount of resources. And one way we make this show possible is by featuring people we know, like and trust, many of whom we have a referral relationship with. So if after listening to this you think, “You know what? I’d love to talk to or hire We Do Web.”

Let them know that you heard their Lawful Good interview and they will, in turn financially support our show for each listener that hires them. Now join me, as we listen in to our conversation where we were discussing who We Do Web is best suited to help, who they really aren’t good for, and why a law firm may or may not want to hire them. So Alex, let’s say I’m a lawyer. I’m not, let’s pretend I am. And I’m like, “Hey, I listened to your interview with you and your wife, Yvette, about the company you started. You used to be called We Do Web Content. Now you’re We Do Web.” What exactly do you do over there?

Alex Valencia:
Thank you for mentioning that. We haven’t fully come out with our new brand of We Do Web. The reason we switched from We Do Web Content, which was obvious of what we did, to We Do Web because in the last five years, we’ve implemented so many other content and content, supporting services that we became really good at, and didn’t really know that we were already providing. We do everything from what website design, to website development, the content, obviously that goes on all of those websites.

We help our clients with newsletters. But the most important thing we find out from our clients is, and you mentioned it in our talk, is that human connection. Who are they? What are their goals? A lot of the clients that we’re taking on right now, Luke, are people that are going from, “I used to be a solo law firm. I’m watching all these masterminds. I’m on social media and I want to take my practice to the next level. I’m ready to hire that next attorney. I’m ready to bring on 10, intake people. How do I get to the next level?”

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. A lot of SEO agencies’ content is a part of what they do, but you’re leading with content. Why do you lead with that as what you do, versus maybe all the other, different competencies that are part of a robust SEO approach?

Alex Valencia:
I lead with content because after doing this for almost 15 years, it is the backbone of any marketing strategy. It’s not just the content on the web right now with the rise of social media. Everything about social media is content, right? People are calling themselves content generators. Guys that are on TikTech, Instagram, on Facebook, YouTube, those are content creators, but they’re creating content for themselves.

We pride ourselves on creating content for our partners, our clients. We know that’s the backbone. Google itself said they are still a text algorithm, so everything that they look at is text. Even if you do a video on YouTube, you’re going to have to get it transcribed, or at least put a description so Google knows what it’s about.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. Content can be done very simply or quickly, and you can cut corners. It can be shallow. I see a lot of law firms’ websites that have a car accident page, and it’ll be 400 words, and sound pretty generic. How do you not have generic content?

Alex Valencia:
There’s easy content that you can find out there. You can go to Textbroker. You can go to different companies out there, where you just buy a piece of content from a writer, right? This person’s not trained in legal. They’re not trained in editing. They’re not trained in SEO optimization. They’re not trained in writing metadata. They’re not trained in writing page titles or URL structure. You can easily go buy that. But as an attorney, if you’re going to go and buy that content, now you’re the editor.

Now you’re the SEO. Now you’re the optimizer, you’re everything. How much value are you actually making by just buying that piece of content? When you come to We Do Web, we’re doing that for you. We have that formula. We’ve been proven to do it for the last 13 years for law firms all across the country, and some of the top 10, 20 law firms in the country in the PI space. We know what we’re doing. We know exactly what you need. We know the strategy that has to go into it, so much work, right?

So you said content can be easy, but when it comes to us, we make it easy because we’re just delivering it to you or your SEO company.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
But in essence, it starts with research, high, high research where you’re developing a strategy based on competitor analysis, gap analysis, search queries, permalink structure, competitors, what they’re doing word counts, right? A lot of research, hours and hours, go into just building the plan. And then executing the plan, seven or eight people are touching a piece of content before it’s published on a website.

Luke W Russell:
Why are you putting that much into a piece of content?

Alex Valencia:
So we have a strategic checklist of everything that should be in a piece of content from the URL structure, the page title, all the metadata, the H1s, H2s, not to mention the content that’s within the piece. Everything starts from the strategy, right? A piece of content is not developed unless it’s part of the strategy, unless it’s been researched.

We know the word count. We know the keywords, we know the competitor analysis, we know the potential ROI in it. That’s one person touching it. Then it goes to the writer, a writing team. Then it goes to an associate editor, and then it goes into our senior editor. Then it goes to a QA team. Then it goes to the publishing.

Luke W Russell:
Wow. Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
Publishing and posting team that makes sure all the information is put into the WordPress platform correctly, and if there’re any opportunities for schema or coding.

Luke W Russell:
Wow.

Alex Valencia:
And then again, that piece of content is also sent to the client for approval. So the client’s also looking at it, making sure. And then it’s also going back, with any special edits from the client, back to our senior editor to put their profile back into the client profile.

We have a whole profile on that client of what they like, don’t like, and we continue to build on that. Then that goes into our automated dictionary for legal, for Bar rules, for content preferences from the client that the editors can catch when they’re writing or editing the piece.

Luke W Russell:
Can you tell me a little more about this software that you built in-house that allows you to ensure your quality for individual clients?

Alex Valencia:
Yeah. So it’s been a long time coming. We’ve been building it for two years. We’re in beta testing still because I keep adding stuff to it. I’m like, “Oh, it’d be cool if we could do this, right?”

Luke W Russell:
Yep.

Alex Valencia:
We were supposed to launch in August and I just kept adding stuff to it, both on the SEO end and the content editing end. But I think what’s brilliant about it and that no one definitely has or thought of is the dictionary. Grammarly does an amazing job capturing different things. Well, we built a legal Grammarly that once we build the client profile, we can tell the dictionary, obviously their name, phone number to make sure that it catches anything, right? People, we’re humans, we make mistakes when we write. So make sure the name, phone number, obviously the name of the firm is correct, addresses, little things like that.

But more importantly, small words, Bar rule words, things that you can and cannot say. If the client says, “I don’t want you to use, we can, or we must,” then it’ll catch that as well. Every client has their own specific profile in this dictionary, and it’ll be caught by the editing team. It’ll be alerted just like on a Grammarly scale, it would show don’t use this word. Here’s a suggested word to use instead.

Luke W Russell:
What I love about that is that you’re actually sure. You’re not just like, “Oh, okay. The client wants me to say this in the future and I hope I remember.” You’re actually then able to be like, “Oh, the client wants this. We put this into our software.” So now when a writer is working on it in the future, even if they hadn’t ever worked on this client before, they know this client doesn’t want to use that language.”

Alex Valencia:
Exactly.

Luke W Russell:
Wow. So you also mentioned you decide a strategy. I just want to point to the fact that you’re not creating content at a whim of what do we… You don’t have a meeting where the account manager’s like, “Ooh, I wonder what content we should create this month?”

Alex Valencia:
No, no. We know, so we’ll know ahead of time. And usually, our content strategy’s, whether we do it or our content strategy team do it, it’s built out a quarter in advance. So the client knows what we’re writing as well. And that’s one of the biggest things that people fail with SEO companies is that transparency or not knowing, what are you doing? The benefit of working with We Do Web is even if you don’t know, it’s still a people are like, “Well, what goes on in the background with SEO?”

You know what happens with content. You know that content’s being developed and that’s the way you’re growing. If you’re adding consistent amount of content, Google keeps coming back. So there’s a lot of value, there’s a huge expense that goes along with it. I talk to SEO agencies all the time and content is their burden. It’s everyone’s big burden because they either can’t find the agency to do it, they can’t get the client to do it. And no one wants to build a content team. We’ve done that, we’ve done it successfully, and we continue to grow. We expand upon ourselves.

We keep learning every, single day. We built a software system to try to make the system, our process, and our machine moves smoother, quicker, more efficient, and more cost efficient so we can give that back to the client, but yet there’s still a lot of costs that go into it. So if you do go out and buy a cheap piece of content, it may cost you $120. But now, you got to come in and edit it. You got to optimize it. You got to post it. You got to make sure nothing breaks when you do publish it. You got to make sure Google’s alerted, right?

Make sure all the metadata is written. If you’re using WordPress, WordPress doesn’t build the right permalink structures so you need an SEO or someone that understands SEO to build the permalink structure for the website correctly. It’s not just buying a piece of content anymore.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. How do you decide which content to make?

Alex Valencia:
It’s strategy. Research, competitive analysis, gap analysis. There’s so many law firms nowadays that are doing it so well that are ranking. Obviously, ranking is still important, both short vanity keywords and long-tail keywords.

So finding those law firms, even if they are our own in different markets, is building out that strategy. The strategy helps us decide what content. We do it quarterly, or we revise its strategy on a monthly basis to make sure we’re also creating evergreen. And then new content, like 10X content.

Luke W Russell:
What’s that mean, 10X content?

Alex Valencia:
So 10X, it’s like 10 times a regular page.

Luke W Russell:
Oh, yeah.

Alex Valencia:
So it’s almost like a small ebook. It’d be like a really, long page, but super informative. Google loves it.

Luke W Russell:
Yep.

Alex Valencia:
And it’s a good opportunity to really invest and give the user a whole bunch of information that’s going to be helpful to their case or whatever it is they’re looking for.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. From a client experience for lawyers, some people want access to the people they’re paying for all this. What’s the client experience like for when people come work with We Do Web?

Alex Valencia:
I think it’s great. We make a human connection. Every client that I have, I’ve probably had a beer with or met him at a conference. We’ve been very fortunate to work with people that we like, that also like us. We have an awesome account management team that worked directly with, as a liaison with the client, our SEO partners, and our writing and editing team. So they’re definitely the advocate for the client at all times, helping them manage their account, making sure they’re doing everything correctly, and we’re fun.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. I think because someone looks at words on a page and then we see so many words, every website has words on a page. I think in some sense, we’ve almost lost the value of what’s really, good copywriting, what’s good content worth.

I get the sense that you’re not a cheap piece of content. But so for the person whose maybe just a little like, “Well, should I really need to spend this much on my content?” What would you say to that?

Alex Valencia:
Yeah, it’s an investment. It’d be like investing in a salesperson, right? Your content is your 24/7 salesperson. One piece of content could bring in a $500,000, $1 million case. It could bring in hundreds of $10,000 cases, right? Your piece of content, when Google finds it and the user clicks on that, it’s going to bring you cases. That’s what it’s there for. When we develop a content piece, we want Google to love it.

We want the user experience to be good enough for the clients to pick up the phone, call or fill up the contact form so you, as a lawyer, get a lead or a case out of it. It’d be great if we had to bandwidth to quantify the value of a page, right? I keep going back to car accident because let’s say, we’re just talking to a PI. You could be talking to a criminal attorney, you can be talking to a family law attorney.

Luke W Russell:
Right, right.

Alex Valencia:
That location, evergreen piece of content, once someone picks up the phone, that’s what drove it, right? If they did a Google search organically, not an ad, and landed on that page and picked up the phone and called, that was your salesperson. And you paid a couple $100 for that, and you’re going to make thousands. The return on investment and content is by far better than anything else because of longevity of it, right? And when you talk about ads, ads are great, right? It makes sense to pay a lot for an ad, because you’re going to get value in it. But with content, we have to price it in a certain way where you’re delivering a quality piece but we’re also dealing in volume, right?

Luke W Russell:
I couldn’t charge $2,000 a page for 100 pages. Everyone would go broke, even though it’s worth it. If I was doing maybe 10 pages a month or something or 10,000 words, that might work out. But when you’re doing 40,000, 20,000, 100,000 words a month for a client, it could get pricey. We developed a system to where we’re still keeping it affordable, but it’s going to deliver ROI.

Why would someone want to come more work with you, where you’re going to work with another partner on other aspects like technical SEO, then go to an agency that does everything in-house?

Alex Valencia:
What we do is the backbone of every SEO strategy, right? You can’t do SEO without content. Every SEO provider is a content provider as well, right? They can’t do anything without content. So whether you come directly to us or go to one of our partners directly, you’re still possibly getting the content directly from us. The strategies, the work, the same formulas are coming from us. But if you come directly to us, we’re going to partner you with, it’s just a bigger web. So depending on what your needs are, what your growth factors is, we can put you in touch with the right person that we’re going to partner together with, that we’ve had success with.

Their core competency is legal SEO so we’re going to partner you with the right people. We still operate as one company. I’d rather work with someone who’s amazing at one thing than just okay at 100 of them, and we’re amazing at content. Our SEO partners have proven themselves to be the best of the best in the legal industry for what they do on the SEO side of things. There’s so many different vendors out there. We both go to conferences.

Luke W Russell:
Yep.

Alex Valencia:
It’s gotten to where it was two people to 12 doing in the digital space and I’m sure they all work well, but they probably don’t have the longevity.

Luke W Russell:
Right.

Alex Valencia:
Or they came in from a different vertical and saw the opportunity in legal, where we are the pioneers in legal.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
I can say that with a straight face. I know it. When I first started, I was on LinkedIn. There were very little SEO companies out there doing legal work. The ones that were, are still around and they do great work, but there weren’t any content companies. We were the first, legal content company that existed.

We’ve been doing it for 12 years. We were able to develop relationships with a lot of those legal-only, SEO companies. We try to work closely with all of them. And everyone’s got their own secret sauce when it comes to SEO, but they all perform very well.

Luke W Russell:
Who are you not good for? Not everybody’s great for every law firm out there. Who are the people that you’re like, “You know what? We are probably not the right fit for law firms of a certain situation.”

Alex Valencia:
I would say highly, business educational content, commercial litigation, anything in corporate in the legal space or business litigation. Something that’s going to be so highly researched that most of your business probably just comes from referrals, anyways. I would pull away from SEO and content completely because your real partnerships are in referral relationships with other people. You should have a good website.

You should have good content explaining what you do. But if you’re not really going after to try to get business in your location or 100 locations, it’s probably not going to work out. It’s definitely not for the fearful. It’s not for the person, who’s investing back into the firm. Our clients that are super successful are sometimes two attorneys. The marketing attorney, the guy who’s go, go, go, go. Let’s reinvest back into the business, and the litigator, or the person that’s both in mind.

One that says, “Not only am I going to court and doing this, I’m putting this in your hands because I want to grow.” So it’s a person that’s not stagnant. It’s not a person who’s ready to retire. It’s a person, who’s got six to eight months to really invest in building out that content strategy, and building out those content pages that are eventually going to bring that business in. A good, recent example, he had an amazing story and we were fortunate enough to be part of that beginning of his story.

Someone who realized, read all the books, got in the masterminds and decided, “How am I going to take my life first and my family to the next level. And to do that, I need to change my business and change my mindset.” The goal was, “How am I going to hire my first attorney?”

Luke W Russell:
Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
So he came to us, we helped him with his SEO. He worked with Chris to get his video going, he started doing ads as well. A year and a half later, during COVID all this happened.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
Amazing growth, amazing transformation in not only a person, but a law firm who brought on that other attorney, brought another employees, got a new office structure, a building, and recently went from the amount that he was paying us to almost twice that because his business grew so fast with it.

But it was that dedication, and initial investment, and that drive, right? You got to have that drive. You got to want to change your life. And that’s what got him to the next level. I’m sure in two years, he’s probably going to upgrade and add more content again as well.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. Now what about for someone who’s maybe earlier in their firm stage? They’re like, “I really want to go after SEO, but I’m in a competitive market. Also, I can’t do $50,000, $100,000 a month on SEO to compete.” Do you have options for people, who maybe aren’t as established yet?

Alex Valencia:
So on the content side, that’s what’s great about coming directly to us is we can work with you on making sure the website’s healthy, getting that investment taken care of. And then we can do content alone for a good period of time so Google starts recognizing that you’re building up that portfolio of content and building that silo. When you do start seeing some business come in from that organic, it’s going to obviously take longer without the link building and some of the technical SEO.

But when you do, now you can start investing in that link building. You can start building in that authority building, and doing some more technical stuff that are going to drive and push it a little further. But if you’re going to start, you might as well start with the content. So we will take on the smaller clients with a lower budget to help them get to the next level.

Luke W Russell:
What hope or options are there for somebody who’s in a big market like Dallas or New York City?

Alex Valencia:
That’s a great question. Dallas and New York City all have other small cities that you can go after and start building it. My friend, Jason, at a conference, a lawyer asked, “Well, what do you do? Where do you start?” And well, you just do, right? If it’s one thing, if you’re just doing one article a month, one article a week of evergreen content, you’re starting somewhere. So even if someone came to me with a budget that we typically wouldn’t take on, I’d help them because it’s a building block, right?

Content compounds on top of each other. So it may take longer than it would for someone with a big budget, but even someone with a small budget can compete if they’re developing the right amount of content. It just might just go a little bit slower than it would. So I would definitely, if you don’t have the budget to go full SEO, at least get your website healthy and start developing content for it, whether it be video. Get it transcribed and turn those into evergreen articles, or use a company like We Do Web to develop those content strategies, and content pages for you.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. Now, some lawyers have a sour taste from working with different SEO vendors. There can be a lot of cynical frustration with SEO vendors and people will hop around. If there’s a person who’s not been thrilled with the results they’re getting, and they’re just like, “Man, another SEO option here. Can’t I just put my money somewhere else?”

Alex Valencia:
Yeah, you get that a lot. And the argument there is there are a lot of SEO companies that don’t do just legal work, right? A lot of the ones that are in the legal space have performed and have done well. Things do eventually sometimes seem like they become static, but it’s that continued growth, that continued content. If you’re looking at an SEO firm and they’re only providing four blogs in a newsletter and they’re calling that content, then that’s probably why you’re not getting the results. That’s usually what you’ll see. If I get a complaining attorney that’ll come to me, “Oh, another SEO company.”

I’ll be like, “Well, how many links are they creating, or how much I content are they developing?” And they’ll be like, “Well, I don’t even know.” First of all, there’s no transparency. And secondly, they don’t know what content they’re providing and putting on their site, if any. A blog is not the right piece of content for you to generate cases. You have to have evergreen location-based, practice area, service pages. Those are going to be… Research shows that anywhere from 1,800 to 2,800 words is what those main, evergreen pages should be. So a lot of work in research goes into that.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. So talk to me a little bit about practice area, service pages versus because we spent years hearing about we need to have blogs, we need to have blogs, we need to have blogs. Now it’s like, “Oh, we need to have a bunch of location-based service pages.” Help me understand why that’s the case in 2021, and 2022 and beyond, and why it’s not go out and write a bunch of blogs?

Alex Valencia:
Well, it never was blogs. I think the reason people started talking about blogs is because it made it simple for the person to do it. Let me write about what I do, what I love. Content always had to be based on a silo and that silo is the theme of your website. If you’re a personal injury site, you want to start the silo with everything personal injury.

Luke W Russell:
Right.

Alex Valencia:
Every practice area, every sub practice area, secondary, tertiary. All those separate pages create a fishing pole in the water for you. If you’re not developing that, you’re not opening up the opportunity for Google to see it. And then if Google doesn’t see it or Yahoo, Bing, obviously Google’s the majority, no one else is going to find it.

Luke W Russell:
Right.

Alex Valencia:
Most blogs on a site, especially news blogs, anyone writing news blogs for their website is content that eventually you’re going to have to take down because it’s dated and it’s going to go away, right? That’s a lot of tracking, it’s a lot of maintenance that you have to do that could break a site. I had a conversation with a large, law firm this afternoon that they’ve been writing only blogs for the past five years.

Luke W Russell:
Oh, wow.

Alex Valencia:
Well, once they hire us, we got to go in and get rid of them.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. Location-based service pages. That means this is each practice area. This is slip and falls in Miami, Florida. This is rear-ends in Miami, Florida. And then doing that same page for Orlando, or even outer areas around Fort Lauderdale and all the different little areas. Is that what you’re saying people should be spending their focus on?

Alex Valencia:
If you’re in a market like Fort Lauderdale, you’re going to go after all the Fort Lauderdale pages. And then you’re going to go after all the secondary markets around Fort Lauderdale, Plantation, Davy. You’re going to create content around that, obviously, depending on the budget, but you’re going to start with personal injury. Then obviously, what your main practice area in personal injury is probably going to be car accidents.

So you’re going to have your Fort Lauderdale car accident page. Then you’re going to have your Fort Lauderdale car accident rear-end page, right? You start creating the bread crumb for everything associated to it and creating that silo. So everything that goes under car accident, and slip and fall, [inaudible 00:26:39], right? You start just developing everything under that with a location.

Luke W Russell:
When you say silo, it’s this idea of you have your parent topic, and then a subtopic, and then subtopics and subtopics. But you’re creating a website structure so that it’s clear that this is all part of this topical section.

Alex Valencia:
Right. And that’s what our SEL team does so amazingly is everything is by design. This architecture, this permalink, this breadcrumb, and the site architecture is built specifically, so those pages all interlink so well together, that not only the spiders can crawl it, but it’s easier for the user to see it as well. You got to make it easy for Google to find those pages. When it lands on a website that says, let’s call it, Florida Personal Injury Lawyer. It’s going to want to know that all the cities and counties of Florida go to that website. It’s going to want to know that personal injury is the main case.

What are all the other practice areas that fall into personal injury? Google wants to look at that. Then it’s going to look at all the different locations, right? A lot of our websites you’ll see have a glossary of areas we serve. That’s all by design, by the amazing SEO team and content strategy team that developed that. But the technical part of it and that architecture is a beautiful thing, right? It’s something that a lot of work goes into to design it. Then you furnish it with all of the content.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. I’ve seen websites you’ll have done where there’re dozens of different locations and they’ll all have these same topics, and yet the pages are actually different in the actual content. Even if it’s again, going in the personal injury topic, you might have 35 personal injury page pages for 35 different locations, but yet they’re not copy and paste with the same content.

Alex Valencia:
Correct, right. Everything has to be original. You’re differentiating that page by something specific to that location. The more content opportunities to have, the more possibilities you have of getting cases from that. I have a client, who he’s gung ho, but he’s like, “Why are we writing all these little cities?” He went from a small market to taking over a whole state. So to do that, we had to tell Google, since we’re taking over the state, here are all the markets that he’s in. And then there’re smaller cities in there. Cities, I live in Florida, I’ve never even heard of.

But he’s like, “Why am I getting a case from here? I never even heard of the city, but I was lucky to find a doctor and people.” So the organic strategy was working so well that eventually you start getting cases in markets that you didn’t know you could work in. That’s a good strategy for those people that are in a really competitive market. And their office is usually outside of where the main market they want business from is, to start there. Start their core business from where your office is located and start building out from there, from those little cities.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah. What would you say to the lawyer who’s dissatisfied with their current SEO vendor. Before firing them, what would you say to them?

Alex Valencia:
Give us a call. We’d love to review what they’re doing, the amount of content. We could run a report the SEO space is so weird. You could take on any site and find issues with it. That’s just what it is, right? You don’t have time to fix everything.

Luke W Russell:
Right, yep.

Alex Valencia:
So a lot of the times when someone comes, I’ll say they’re actually doing a pretty good job.

Luke W Russell:
Yeah.

Alex Valencia:
Maybe you might want to just ask them to upgrade, give you a little bit more content, and move things a little faster, or we can help you with that. But a lot of the time people aren’t doing that bad of a job.

Luke W Russell:
So as far as ways for people to learn more, I know you’ve got your website, you’ve got a podcast. If somebody’s like, “Okay, Alex, I’m interested just at least to learn more,” where would you send them?

Alex Valencia:
They can check our YouTube page, we Do Web. We’ve got tons of videos and resources there. And they can also probably find out on the website, wedoweb.com. I do also have a podcast where we interview other SEOs, other lawyers in the industry, other marketers in the industry called the We Do Marketing Hour.

Luke W Russell:
If you are thinking, “Yeah, I’d like to speak with this we Do Web team,” or want to check out more information on the work that they do, go to wedoweb.com. If you do reach out to them, please let them know that you decided to contact them after listening to the Lawful Good interviews. By doing so, you are help support the podcast and the work we are doing in the world. Thanks so much for listening to us this week.

This podcast is produced by Kirsten Stock, edited by Kendall Perkinson and mastered by Gillio Bertollini. A special thanks to the companies that make this project possible, Russell Media and the SEO Police. You can learn more about these groups by visiting our website, lawfulgoodpodcast.com. I’m your host, Luke W. Russell, and you’ve been listening to Lawful Good.